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Introduction to Computer Graphics

(3 reviews)

David Eck, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Pub Date: 2016

Publisher: Independent

Language: English

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Reviews

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Reviewed by Marietta Cameron, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville on 2/2/18

The author intentionally and most understandably designed this text to present material for a one semester undergraduate course. Thus the topic coverage is a subset of material typically presented in texts addressing computer graphics. I... read more

 

Reviewed by Brian Barsky, Professor of Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley on 2/2/18

This book is a guide for how write graphics programs using OpenGL and WebGL. It does not provide a an explanation of the concepts, methods, mathematics, physics algorithms, science, psychology, etc., etc., that one would find in a standard... read more

 

Reviewed by Jong Kwan Lee, Associate Professor, Bowling Green State University on 2/2/18

The contents of the book cover many topics in computer graphics that should be enough for an introductory level computer graphics course. However, some contents might need a little more explanation (e.g., Bezier curves) and I would like it to... read more

 

Table of Contents

Preface

  • Chapter 1: Introduction
  • Chapter 2: Two-Dimensional Graphics
  • Chapter 3: OpenGL 1.1: Geometry
  • Chapter 4: OpenGL 1.1: Light and Material
  • Chapter 5: Three.js: A 3D Scene Graph API
  • Chapter 6: Introduction to WebGL
  • Chapter 7: 3D Graphics with WebGL
  • Chapter 8: Beyond Realtime Graphics

Appendix A: Programming Languages
Appendix B: Blender: A 3D Modeling Program
Appendix C: Gimp and Inkscape for 2D Graphics
Appendix D: Source Code for Sample Programs
Appendix E: Glossary
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About the Book

Introduction to Computer Graphics is a free, on-line textbook covering the fundamentals of computer graphics and computer graphics programming. This book is meant for use as a textbook in a one-semester course that would typically be taken by undergraduate computer science majors in their third or fourth year of college.

About the Contributors

Author

David J. Eck Ph.D. is a Professor at Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Hobart and William Smith Colleges.