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Music in World Cultures

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Matthew Mihalka , University of Arkansas

Justin R. Hunter, University of Arkansas

Copyright Year: 2021

Publisher: University of Arkansas

Language: English

Formats Available

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Attribution-NonCommercial Attribution-NonCommercial
CC BY-NC

Table of Contents

  • I. Introduction
  • II. Place
  • III. Identity and Politics
  • IV. Theatre
  • V. Dance
  • VI. Religion and Spirituality

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  • About the Book

    This text provides just a small sampling of some of the various musical styles and traditions that might be found, though the skills developed in this course can be applied to any type of music.

    About the Contributors

    Authors

    Matthew Mihalka joined the Music Department at the University of Arkansas in 2011.  His research addresses the use of music in 20th/21st century American society, particularly during sporting events.  His work has been published in The American OrganistNotesAmerican History through American Sports, and Music in the Social and Behavioral Sciences.  He is the co-editor of Music around the World: A Global Encyclopedia, a three-volume music reference work published in 2020.

    Justin R. Hunter is an ethnomusicologist specializing in Indigenous studies, Japanese studies, and Ozark music of Arkansas. He received his PhD in ethnomusicology from the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and his BA and MM from the University of Arkansas. Dr. Hunter has served as a member of the Society for Ethnomusicology advisory council and in leadership roles for numerous special interest groups, sections, and committees for the society. He currently serves as the co-chair of the Japanese Performing Arts Special Interest Group and the secretary of the Indigenous Music Section. He has book reviews in Ethnomusicology Forum and the journal Notes. He is an alumnus of the Alpha Omicron chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and was inducted into Pi Kappa Lambda in 2009 at the University of Arkansas campus.