Read more about Introduction to Applied Statistics for Psychology Students

Introduction to Applied Statistics for Psychology Students

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Gordon E. Sarty, University of Saskatchewan

Copyright Year: 2022

Publisher: University of Saskatchewan

Language: English

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CC BY-NC-SA

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Reviewed by Mike Love, Instructor, Lewis-Clark State College on 5/18/22

This text provides surface-level overview of many concepts in statistics and probability. read more

Table of Contents

  • 1. Background and Motivation
  • 2. Descriptive Statistics: Frequency Data (Counting)
  • 3. Descriptive Statistics: Central Tendency and Dispersion
  • 4. Probability and the Binomial Distributions
  • 5. The Normal Distributions
  • 6. Percentiles and Quartiles
  • 7. The Central Limit Theorem
  • 8. Confidence Intervals
  • 9. Hypothesis Testing
  • 10. Comparing Two Population Means
  • 11. Comparing Proportions
  • 12. ANOVA
  • 13. Power
  • 14. Correlation and Regression
  • 15. Chi Squared: Goodness of Fit and Contingency Tables
  • 16. Non-parametric Tests
  • 17. Overview of the General Linear Model

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  • About the Book

    Introduction to Applied Statistics for Psychology Students, by Gordon E. Sarty (Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan) began as a textbook published in PDF format, in various editions between 2014-2017. The book was written to meet the needs of University of Saskatchewan psychology students at the undergraduate (PSY 233, PSY 234) level.

    In 2019-2020, funding was provided through the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning, along with technical assistance from the Distance Education Unit, to update and adapt this book, making it more widely available in an easy-to-use and more adaptable digital (Pressbooks) format. The update also made revisions so that the book could be published with a license appropriate for open educational resources (OER).

    OERs are defined as “teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others” (Hewlett Foundation). This textbook and other OERs like it are openly licensed using a Creative Commons license, and are offered in various digital and e-book formats free of charge.

    Printed editions of this book can be obtained for a nominal fee through the University of Saskatchewan bookstore.

    About the Contributors

    Author

    Gordon E. Sarty, University of Saskatchewan