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Signal Computing: Digital Signals in the Software Domain

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Michael D. Stiber, University of Washington Bothell

Bilin Zhang Stiber, University of Washington Bothell

Eric C. Larson, Southern Methodist University

Pub Date: 2016

Publisher: Independent

Language: English

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CC BY-SA

Table of Contents

  • 1 Signals in the Physical World
  • 2 Signals in the Computer
  • 3 Filtering and Feedforward Filters
  • 4 The Z-Transform and Convolution
  • 5 Feedback Filters
  • 6 Spectral Analysis
  • 7 Compression
  • 8 Audio & Video Compression and Coding
  • 9 Review and Conclusions

About the Book

In this book, you will learn how digital signals are captured, represented, processed, communicated, and stored in computers. The specific topics we will cover include: physical properties of the source information (such as sound or images), devices for information cap- ture (microphones, cameras), digitization, compression, digital signal representation (JPEG, MPEG), digital signal processing (DSP), and network communication. By the end of this book, you should understand the problems and solutions facing signal computing systems development in the areas of user interfaces, information retrieval, data structures and algo- rithms, and communications.

About the Contributors

Authors

Michael D. Stiber (Ph.D., UCLA, 1992). Associate Dean, School of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics at University of Washington Bothell. Professor and Interim Chair, Computing & Software Systems Division. Principal Investigator, Biocomputing Laboratory.

Bilin Z. Stiber received a MS and PhD from the Department of Biophysical Engineering, Osaka University (Osaka, Japan), where she was subsequently an Assistant Professor. She also holds BS in physics. She was a research scientist at The Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, and a research scientist in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department at the University of California, Berkeley.

Eric C. Larson, Assistant Professor in Computer Science and Engineering in the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University. Received Doctorate from the University of Washington where he was a Intel Science and Technology fellow.