Search results for "physics"

Read more about Signal Computing: Digital Signals in the Software Domain

Signal Computing: Digital Signals in the Software Domain

Contributors: Stiber, Zhang Stiber, and Larson

Publisher: Michael Stiber, Eric Larson

In this book, you will learn how digital signals are captured, represented, processed, communicated, and stored in computers. The specific topics we will cover include: physical properties of the source information (such as sound or images), devices for information cap- ture (microphones, cameras), digitization, compression, digital signal representation (JPEG, MPEG), digital signal processing (DSP), and network communication. By the end of this book, you should understand the problems and solutions facing signal computing systems development in the areas of user interfaces, information retrieval, data structures and algo- rithms, and communications.

(1 review)

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Read more about Linear Algebra

Linear Algebra

Contributors: Cherney, Denton, and Waldon

Publisher: University of California, Davis

We believe the entire book can be taught in twenty five 50-minute lectures to a sophomore audience that has been exposed to a one year calculus course. Vector calculus is useful, but not necessary preparation for this book, which attempts to be self-contained. Key concepts are presented multiple times, throughout the book, often first in a more intuitive setting, and then again in a definition, theorem, proof style later on. We do not aim for students to become agile mathematical proof writers, but we do expect them to be able to show and explain why key results hold. We also often use the review exercises to let students discover key results for themselves; before they are presented again in detail later in the book.

(2 reviews)

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Read more about Calculus for the Life Sciences: A Modeling Approach Volume 2

Calculus for the Life Sciences: A Modeling Approach Volume 2

Contributors: Cornette and Ackerman

Publisher: A.T. Still University

Our writing is based on three premises. First, life sciences students are motivated by and respond well to actual data related to real life sciences problems. Second, the ultimate goal of calculus in the life sciences primarily involves modeling living systems with difference and differential equations. Understanding the concepts of derivative and integral are crucial, but the ability to compute a large array of derivatives and integrals is of secondary importance. Third, the depth of calculus for life sciences students should be comparable to that of the traditional physics and engineering calculus course; else life sciences students will be short changed and their faculty will advise them to take the 'best' (engineering) course.

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Read more about Calculus for the Life Sciences: A Modeling Approach Volume 1

Calculus for the Life Sciences: A Modeling Approach Volume 1

Contributors: Cornette and Ackerman

Publisher: A.T. Still University

Our writing is based on three premises. First, life sciences students are motivated by and respond well to actual data related to real life sciences problems. Second, the ultimate goal of calculus in the life sciences primarily involves modeling living systems with difference and differential equations. Understanding the concepts of derivative and integral are crucial, but the ability to compute a large array of derivatives and integrals is of secondary importance. Third, the depth of calculus for life sciences students should be comparable to that of the traditional physics and engineering calculus course; else life sciences students will be short changed and their faculty will advise them to take the 'best' (engineering) course.

(1 review)

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Read more about Physical Modeling in MATLAB

Physical Modeling in MATLAB

Contributor: Downey

Publisher: Green Tea Press

Most books that use MATLAB are aimed at readers who know how to program. This book is for people who have never programmed before. As a result, the order of presentation is unusual. The book starts with scalar values and works up to vectors and matrices very gradually. This approach is good for beginning programmers, because it is hard to understand composite objects until you understand basic programming semantics. But there are problems:

(9 reviews)

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Read more about Light and Matter

Light and Matter

Contributor: Crowell

Publisher: Benjamin Crowell

This is an introductory text intended for a one-year introductory course of the type typically taken by biology majors, or for AP Physics B. Algebra and trig are used, and there are optional calculus-based sections.

(2 reviews)

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Read more about Introduction to Probability

Introduction to Probability

Contributors: Grinstead and Snell

Publisher: American Mathematical Society

Probability theory began in seventeenth century France when the two great French mathematicians, Blaise Pascal and Pierre de Fermat, corresponded over two problems from games of chance. Problems like those Pascal and Fermat solved continuedto influence such early researchers as Huygens, Bernoulli, and DeMoivre in establishing a mathematical theory of probability. Today, probability theory is a wellestablished branch of mathematics that finds applications in every area of scholarlyactivity from music to physics, and in daily experience from weather prediction topredicting the risks of new medical treatments.

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Read more about Introduction to Physical Oceanography

Introduction to Physical Oceanography

Contributor: Stewart

This textbook covers physical-oceanographic processes, theories, data, and measurements, targeted at upper-division undergraduates and graduate students in oceanography, meteorology, and ocean engineering. In addition to the classical topics, the author includes discussions of heat fluxes, the role of the ocean in climate, the deep circulation, equatorial processes including El Nino, data bases used by oceanographers, the role of satellites and data from space, ship-based measurements, and the importance of vorticity in understanding oceanic flows. Students should have studied differential equations and introductory college physics, although math is de-emphasized.

(4 reviews)

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