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Read more about Light and Matter

Light and Matter

Benjamin Crowell, Fullerton College

This is an introductory text intended for a one-year introductory course of the type typically taken by biology majors, or for AP Physics B. Algebra and trig are used, and there are optional calculus-based sections.

(2 reviews)

Read more about Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems

Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems

Hiroki Sayama, State University of New York at Binghamton

Introduction to the Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems introduces students to mathematical/computational modeling and analysis developed in the emerging interdisciplinary field of Complex Systems Science. Complex systems are systems made of a large number of microscopic components interacting with each other in nontrivial ways. Many real-world systems can be understood as complex systems, where critically important information resides in the relationships between the parts and not necessarily within the parts themselves.

(1 review)

Read more about Microeconomics: Markets, Methods and Models

Microeconomics: Markets, Methods and Models

Doug Curtis, Trent University

Ian Irvine, Concordia University

Microeconomics: Markets, Methods and Models provides a concise, yet complete, coverage of introductory microeconomic theory, application and policy in a Canadian and global environment. Our beginning is orthodox: we explain and develop the standard tools of analysis in the discipline. Economic policy is about the well-being of the economy's participants, and economic theory should inform economic policy. So we investigate the meaning of ‘well-being' in the context of an efficient use of the economy's resources early in the text.

(1 review)

Read more about College Algebra

College Algebra

Carl Stitz, Lakeland Community College

Jeff Zeager, Lorain County Community College

College Algebra is an introductory text for a college algebra survey course. The material is presented at a level intended to prepare students for Calculus while also giving them relevant mathematical skills that can be used in other classes. The authors describe their approach as "Functions First," believing introducing functions first will help students understand new concepts more completely.

(9 reviews)

Read more about The Intelligent Troglodyte’s Guide to Plato’s Republic

The Intelligent Troglodyte’s Guide to Plato’s Republic

Douglas Drabkin, Fort Hays State University

The Republic of Plato is one of the classic gateway texts into the study and practice of philosophy, and it is just the sort of book that has been able to arrest and redirect lives. How it has been able to do this, and whether or not it will be able to do this in your own case, is something you can only discover for yourself. The present guidebook aims to help a person get fairly deep, fairly quickly, into the project. It divides the dialogue into 96 sections and provides commentary on each section as well as questions for reflection and exploration. It is organized with a table of contents and is stitched together with a system of navigating bookmarks. Links to external sites such as the Perseus Classical Library are used throughout. This book is suitable for college courses or independent study.

(4 reviews)

Read more about Elementary New Testament Greek

Elementary New Testament Greek

Joseph R. Dongell, Asbury Theological Seminary

The need for this particular grammar arises from the peculiar shape of the MDiv curriculum at Asbury Theological Seminary. Several years ago the faculty adopted a curriculum that required one semester of Greek and one semester of Hebrew, each as preparatory for a basic exegesis course in each discipline.

(1 review)

Read more about Sources of American Law: An Introduction to Legal Research

Sources of American Law: An Introduction to Legal Research

Beau Steenken, University of Kentucky

Tina M. Brooks, University of Northern Iowa

At its most basic definition the practice of law comprises conducting research to find relevant rules of law and then applying those rules to the specific set of circumstances faced by a client. However, in American law, the legal rules to be applied derive from myriad sources, complicating the process and making legal research different from other sorts of research. This text introduces first-year law students to the new kind of research required to study and to practice law. It seeks to demystify the art of legal research by following a “Source and Process” approach. First, the text introduces students to the major sources of American law and describes the forms the various authorities traditionally took in print. After establishing this base, the text proceeds to instruct students on the methods they will most likely use in practice, namely electronic research techniques and the consultation of secondary sources. Sources of Law incorporates screencasts currently hosted on YouTube that actively demonstrate the processes described in the static text. Finally, the text illustrates how the different pieces come together in the legal research process.

(1 review)

Read more about Basic Cell and Molecular Biology 3e: What We Know & How We Found Out

Basic Cell and Molecular Biology 3e: What We Know & How We Found Out

Gerald Bergtrom, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

A grasp of the logic and practice of science is essential to understand the rest of the world around us. To that end, the CMB3e iText (like earlier editions) remains focused on experimental support for what we know about cell and molecular biology, and on showing students the relationship of cell structure and function. Rather than trying to be a comprehensive reference book, CMB3e selectively details investigative questions, methods and experiments that lead to our understanding of cell biology. This focus is nowhere more obvious than in the chapter learning objectives and in external links to supplementary material. The Basic CMB3e version of the iText includes links to external web-sources as well as the author’s short, just-in-time YouTube VOPs (with edited, optional closed captions), all embedded in or near relevant text. Each video is identified with a descriptive title and video play and QR bar codes.

(7 reviews)

Read more about Introduction to Human Osteology

Introduction to Human Osteology

Roberta Hall, Oregon State University

Kenneth Beals, Oregon State University

Holm Neumann

Georg Neumann, Indiana University

Gwyn Madden, Grand Valley State University


This text was designed for use in the human osteology laboratory classroom. Bones are described to aid in identification of skeletonized remains in either an archaeological or forensic anthropology setting. Basic techniques for siding, aging, sexing, and stature estimation are described. Both images of bone and drawings are included which may be used for study purposes outside of the classroom. The text represents work that has been developed over more than 30 years by its various authors and is meant to present students with the basic analytical tools for the study of human osteology.

(7 reviews)

Read more about Genre in a Changing World

Genre in a Changing World

Charles Bazerman, University of California, Santa Barbara

Adair Bonini, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil

Débora Figueiredo

Genre studies and genre approaches to literacy instruction continue to develop in many regions and from a widening variety of approaches. Genre has provided a key to understanding the varying literacy cultures of regions, disciplines, professions and educational settings. Genre in a Changing World,edited by Charles Bazerman, Adair Bonini, and Débora Figueiredo,provides a wide-ranging sampler of the remarkable variety of current work. The twenty-four chapters in this volume, reflecting the work of scholars in Europe, Australasia, North and South America, were selected from more than 400 presentations at SIGET IV (the Fourth International Symposium on Genre Studies), held on the campus of UNISUL in Tubarão, Santa Catarina, Brazil in August 2007—the largest gathering on genre to that date. The chapters also represent a wide variety of approaches including rhetoric, Systemic Functional Linguistics, media and critical cultural studies, sociology, phenomenology, enunciation theory, the Geneva school of educational sequences, cognitive psychology, relevance theory, sociocultural psychology, activity theory, Gestalt psychology, and schema theory. Sections are devoted to theoretical issues, studies of genres in the professions, studies of genre and media, teaching and learning genre, and writing across the curriculum. The broad selection of material in this volume displays the full range of contemporary genre studies and sets the ground for a next generation of work.

(2 reviews)