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Read more about A Brief Introduction to Engineering Computation with MATLAB

A Brief Introduction to Engineering Computation with MATLAB

Serhat Beyenir


A Brief Introduction to Engineering Computation with MATLAB is specifically designed for students with no programming experience. However, students are expected to be proficient in First Year Mathematics and Sciences and access to good reference books are highly recommended. Students are assumed to have a working knowledge of the Mac OS X or Microsoft Windows operating systems. The strategic goal of the course and book is to provide learners with an appreciation for the role computation plays in solving engineering problems. MATLAB specific skills that students are expected to be proficient at are: write scripts to solve engineering problems including interpolation, numerical integration and regression analysis, plot graphs to visualize, analyze and present numerical data, and publish reports.

(4 reviews)

Read more about A Byte of Python

A Byte of Python

Swaroop H


"A Byte of Python" is a free book on programming using the Python language. It serves as a tutorial or guide to the Python language for a beginner audience. If all you know about computers is how to save text files, then this is the book for you.

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about A Computational Introduction to Number Theory and Algebra

A Computational Introduction to Number Theory and Algebra

Victor Shoup, New York University


All of the mathematics required beyond basic calculus is developed “from scratch.” Moreover, the book generally alternates between “theory” and “applications”: one or two chapters on a particular set of purely mathematical concepts are followed by one or two chapters on algorithms and applications; the mathematics provides the theoretical underpinnings for the applications, while the applications both motivate and illustrate the mathematics. Of course, this dichotomy between theory and applications is not perfectly maintained: the chapters that focus mainly on applications include the development of some of the mathematics that is specific to a particular application, and very occasionally, some of the chapters that focus mainly on mathematics include a discussion of related algorithmic ideas as well.

(3 reviews)

Read more about A Concise Introduction to Logic

A Concise Introduction to Logic

Craig DeLancey, SUNY Oswego


A Concise Introduction to Logic is an introduction to formal logic suitable for undergraduates taking a general education course in logic or critical thinking, and is accessible and useful to any interested in gaining a basic understanding of logic. This text takes the unique approach of teaching logic through intellectual history; the author uses examples from important and celebrated arguments in philosophy to illustrate logical principles. The text also includes a basic introduction to findings of advanced logic. As indicators of where the student could go next with logic, the book closes with an overview of advanced topics, such as the axiomatic method, set theory, Peano arithmetic, and modal logic. Throughout, the text uses brief, concise chapters that readers will find easy to read and to review.

(3 reviews)

Read more about A Different Road To College: A Guide For Transitioning Non-Traditional Students

A Different Road To College: A Guide For Transitioning Non-Traditional Students

Alise Lamoreaux, Lane Community College


A Different Road To College: A Guide For Transitioning Non-Traditional Students is designed to introduce students to the contextual issues of college. Non-traditional students have an ever-growing presence on college campuses, especially community colleges. This open educational resource is designed to engage students in seeing themselves as college students and understanding the complexity of what that means to their lives.

(15 reviews)

Read more about A First Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering

A First Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Louis Scharf, Colorado State University


This book was written for an experimental freshman course at the University of Colorado. The course is now an elective that the majority of our electrical and computer engineering students take in the second semester of their freshman year, just before their first circuits course. Our department decided to offer this course for several reasons:

(3 reviews)

Read more about A First Course in Linear Algebra

A First Course in Linear Algebra

Robert Beezer, University of Puget Sound

A First Course in Linear Algebra is an introductory textbook aimed at college-level sophomores and juniors. Typically students will have taken calculus, but it is not a prerequisite. The book begins with systems of linear equations, then covers matrix algebra, before taking up finite-dimensional vector spaces in full generality. The final chapter covers matrix representations of linear transformations, through diagonalization, change of basis and Jordan canonical form. Determinants and eigenvalues are covered along the way.

(9 reviews)

Read more about A First Course in Linear Algebra

A First Course in Linear Algebra

Ken Kuttler, Brigham Young University


This text, originally by K. Kuttler, has been redesigned by the Lyryx editorial team as a first course in linear algebra for science and engineering students who have an understanding of basic algebra.

(6 reviews)

Read more about A Foundation Course in Reading German

A Foundation Course in Reading German

Howard Martin

Alan Ng, University of Wisconsin, Madison

This textbook guides a learner who has no previous German experience to gain the ability to accurately understand formal written German prose, aided only by a comprehensive dictionary.

(1 review)

Read more about A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Mathematics

A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Mathematics

Joseph Fields, Southern Connecticut State University


This book is designed for the transition course between calculus and differential equations and the upper division mathematics courses with an emphasis on proof and abstraction. The book has been used by the author and several other faculty at Southern Connecticut State University. There are nine chapters and more than enough material for a semester course. Student reviews are favorable.

(1 review)