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Read more about Precalculus

Precalculus

Thomas Tradler, NYC College of Technology

Holly Carley, NYC College of Technology

These are notes for a course in precalculus, as it is taught at New York City College of Technology - CUNY (where it is offered under the course number MAT 1375). Our approach is calculator based. For this, we will use the currently standard TI-84 calculator, and in particular, many of the examples will be explained and solved with it. However, we want to point out that there are also many other calculators that are suitable for the purpose of this course and many of these alternatives have similar functionalities as the calculator that we have chosen to use. An introduction to the TI-84 calculator together with the most common applications needed for this course is provided in appendix A. In the future we may expand on this by providing introductions to other calculators or computer algebra systems.

 

This course in precalculus has the overarching theme of “functions.” This means that many of the often more algebraic topics studied in the previous courses are revisited under this new function theoretic point of view. However, in order to keep this text as self contained as possible we always recall all results that are necessary to follow the core of the course even if we assume that the student has familiarity with the formula or topic at hand. After a first introduction to the abstract notion of a function, we study polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions with the function viewpoint. Throughout, we will always place particular importance to the corresponding graph of the discussed function which will be analyzed with the help of the TI-84 calculator as mentioned above. These are in fact the topics of the first four (of the five) parts of this precalculus course.

 

In the fifth and last part of the book, we deviate from the above theme and collect more algebraically oriented topics that will be needed in calculus or other advanced mathematics courses or even other science courses. This part includes a discussion of the algebra of complex numbers (in particular complex numbers in polar form), the 2-dimensional real vector space R 2 sequences and series with focus on the arithmetic and geometric series (which are again examples of functions, though this is not emphasized), and finally the generalized binomial theorem.

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Read more about Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

Kenneth Kuttler, Bringham Young University

This is a book on linear algebra and matrix theory. While it is self contained, it will work best for those who have already had some exposure to linear algebra. It is also assumed that the reader has had calculus. Some optional topics require more analysis than this, however.

(1 review)

Read more about Notes on Diffy Qs: Differential Equations for Engineers

Notes on Diffy Qs: Differential Equations for Engineers

Jirí Lebl, Oklahoma State University


A one semester first course on differential equations, aimed at engineering students. Prerequisite for the course is the basic calculus sequence. This free online book (e-book in webspeak) should be usable as a stand-alone textbook or as a companion to a course using another book such as Edwards and Penney, Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling or Boyce and DiPrima, Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems (section correspondence to these two is given). I developed and used these notes to teach Math 286/285 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Sample Dirichlet problem solution (one is a 4-day-a-week, the other a 3-day-a-week semester-long course). I have also taught Math 20D at University of California, San Diego with these notes (a 3-day-a-week quarter-long course). There is enough material to run a 2-quarter course, and even perhaps a two semester course depending on lecturer speed.

(4 reviews)

Read more about A First Course in Linear Algebra

A First Course in Linear Algebra

Ken Kuttler, Brigham Young University

This text, originally by K. Kuttler, has been redesigned by the Lyryx editorial team as a first course in linear algebra for science and engineering students who have an understanding of basic algebra.

(7 reviews)

Read more about Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

Thomas W. Judson, Stephen F. Austin State University

This text is intended for a one- or two-semester undergraduate course in abstract algebra. Traditionally, these courses have covered the theoretical aspects of groups, rings, and fields. However, with the development of computing in the last several decades, applications that involve abstract algebra and discrete mathematics have become increasingly important, and many science, engineering, and computer science students are now electing to minor in mathematics. Though theory still occupies a central role in the subject of abstract algebra and no student should go through such a course without a good notion of what a proof is, the importance of applications such as coding theory and cryptography has grown significantly.

(4 reviews)

Read more about Calculus One

Calculus One

Multiple Authors, Mooculus

Calculus is about the very large, the very small, and how things change—the surprise is that something seemingly so abstract ends up explaining the real world.

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Read more about Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proof, Version 2.1

Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proof, Version 2.1

Ted Sundstrom, Grand Valley State University

Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proofis designed to be a text for the ?rst course in the college mathematics curriculum that introduces students to the processes of constructing and writing proofs and focuses on the formal development of mathematics. The primary goals of the text are to help students:

(2 reviews)

Read more about Introductory Statistics

Introductory Statistics

Multiple Authors, Openstax College

Introductory Statistics follows the scope and sequence of a one-semester, introduction to statistics course and is geared toward students majoring in fields other than math or engineering. This text assumes students have been exposed to intermediate algebra, and it focuses on the applications of statistical knowledge rather than the theory behind it. The foundation of this textbook is Collaborative Statistics, by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean, which has been widely adopted. Introductory Statistics includes innovations in art, terminology, and practical applications, all with a goal of increasing relevance and accessibility for students. We strove to make the discipline meaningful and memorable, so that students can draw a working knowledge from it that will enrich their future studies and help them make sense of the world around them. The text also includes Collaborative Exercises, integration with TI-83,83+,84+ Calculators, technology integration problems, and statistics labs.

(20 reviews)

Read more about Precalculus

Precalculus

Multiple Authors, Openstax College

Precalculus is intended for college-level precalculus students. Since precalculus courses vary from one institution to the next, we have attempted to meet the needs of as broad an audience as possible, including all of the content that might be covered in any particular course. The result is a comprehensive book that covers more ground than an instructor could likely cover in a typical one- or two-semester course; but instructors should find, almost without fail, that the topics they wish to include in their syllabus are covered in the text. Many chapters of Openstax College Precalculus are suitable for other freshman and sophomore math courses such as College Algebra and Trigonometry; however, instructors of those courses might need to supplement or adjust the material. Openstax will also be releasing College Algebra and Algebra and Trigonometry titles tailored to the particular scope, sequence, and pedagogy of those courses.

(5 reviews)

Read more about APEX Calculus

APEX Calculus

Gregory Hartman, Virginia Military Institute

Brian Heinold, Mount St. Mary’s University

Troy Siemers, Virginia Military Institute

Dimplekumar Chalishajar, Virginia Military Institute

Jennifer Bowen, The College of Wooster

This text comprises a three–text series on Calculus. The first part covers material taught in many “Calc 1” courses: limits, derivatives, and the basics of integration, found in Chapters 1 through 6.1. The second text covers material often taught in “Calc 2:” integration and its applications, along with an introduction to sequences, series and Taylor Polynomials, found in Chapters 5 through 8. The third text covers topics common in “Calc 3” or “multivariable calc:” parametric equations, polar coordinates, vector–valued functions, and functions of more than one variable, found in Chapters 9 through 14. More information, including free downloads of .pdf versions of the text, is available at www.apexcalculus.com.

(4 reviews)