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Read more about Calculus One

Calculus One

Multiple Authors, Mooculus

Calculus is about the very large, the very small, and how things change—the surprise is that something seemingly so abstract ends up explaining the real world.

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proof, Version 2.1

Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proof, Version 2.1

Ted Sundstrom, Grand Valley State University

Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proofis designed to be a text for the ?rst course in the college mathematics curriculum that introduces students to the processes of constructing and writing proofs and focuses on the formal development of mathematics. The primary goals of the text are to help students:

(2 reviews)

Read more about Introductory Statistics

Introductory Statistics

Multiple Authors, Openstax College

Introductory Statistics follows the scope and sequence of a one-semester, introduction to statistics course and is geared toward students majoring in fields other than math or engineering. This text assumes students have been exposed to intermediate algebra, and it focuses on the applications of statistical knowledge rather than the theory behind it. The foundation of this textbook is Collaborative Statistics, by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean, which has been widely adopted. Introductory Statistics includes innovations in art, terminology, and practical applications, all with a goal of increasing relevance and accessibility for students. We strove to make the discipline meaningful and memorable, so that students can draw a working knowledge from it that will enrich their future studies and help them make sense of the world around them. The text also includes Collaborative Exercises, integration with TI-83,83+,84+ Calculators, technology integration problems, and statistics labs.

(19 reviews)

Read more about Precalculus

Precalculus

Multiple Authors, Openstax College

Precalculus is intended for college-level precalculus students. Since precalculus courses vary from one institution to the next, we have attempted to meet the needs of as broad an audience as possible, including all of the content that might be covered in any particular course. The result is a comprehensive book that covers more ground than an instructor could likely cover in a typical one- or two-semester course; but instructors should find, almost without fail, that the topics they wish to include in their syllabus are covered in the text. Many chapters of Openstax College Precalculus are suitable for other freshman and sophomore math courses such as College Algebra and Trigonometry; however, instructors of those courses might need to supplement or adjust the material. Openstax will also be releasing College Algebra and Algebra and Trigonometry titles tailored to the particular scope, sequence, and pedagogy of those courses.

(4 reviews)

Read more about APEX Calculus

APEX Calculus

Gregory Hartman, Virginia Military Institute

Brian Heinold, Mount St. Mary’s University

Troy Siemers, Virginia Military Institute

Dimplekumar Chalishajar, Virginia Military Institute

Jennifer Bowen, The College of Wooster

This text comprises a three–text series on Calculus. The first part covers material taught in many “Calc 1” courses: limits, derivatives, and the basics of integration, found in Chapters 1 through 6.1. The second text covers material often taught in “Calc 2:” integration and its applications, along with an introduction to sequences, series and Taylor Polynomials, found in Chapters 5 through 8. The third text covers topics common in “Calc 3” or “multivariable calc:” parametric equations, polar coordinates, vector–valued functions, and functions of more than one variable, found in Chapters 9 through 14. More information, including free downloads of .pdf versions of the text, is available at www.apexcalculus.com.

(4 reviews)

Read more about How We Got from There to Here: A Story of Real Analysis

How We Got from There to Here: A Story of Real Analysis

Robert Rogers, State University of New York

Eugene Boman, The Pennsylvania State University

The typical introductory real analysis text starts with an analysis of the real number system and uses this to develop the definition of a limit, which is then used as a foundation for the definitions encountered thereafter. While this is certainly a reasonable approach from a logical point of view, it is not how the subject evolved, nor is it necessarily the best way to introduce students to the rigorous but highly non-intuitive definitions and proofs found in analysis.

(2 reviews)

Read more about Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems

Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems

William F. Trench, Trinity University


Elementary Differential Equations with Boundary Value Problems is written for students in science, engineering, and mathematics who have completed calculus through partial differentiation.

(5 reviews)

Read more about Introduction to Real Analysis

Introduction to Real Analysis

William F. Trench, Trinity University

This is a text for a two-term course in introductory real analysis for junior or senior mathematics majors and science students with a serious interest in mathematics. Prospective educators or mathematically gifted high school students can also benefit from the mathematical maturity that can be gained from an introductory real analysis course.

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Mathematics

A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Mathematics

Joseph E. Fields, Southern Connecticut State University

This book is designed for the transition course between calculus and differential equations and the upper division mathematics courses with an emphasis on proof and abstraction. The book has been used by the author and several other faculty at Southern Connecticut State University. There are nine chapters and more than enough material for a semester course. Student reviews are favorable.

(1 review)

Read more about Active Calculus 2.0

Active Calculus 2.0

Matt Boelkins, Grand Valley State University

David Austin, Grand Valley State University

Steve Schlicker, Grand Valley State University

Active Calculus is different from most existing calculus texts in at least the following ways: the text is freely readable online in HTML format and is also available for in PDF; in the electronic format, graphics are in full color and there are live links to java applets; version 2.0 now contains WeBWorK exercises in each chapter, which are fully interactive in the HTML format and included in print in the PDF; the text is open source, and interested users can gain access to the original source files on GitHub; the style of the text requires students to be active learners — there are very few worked examples in the text, with there instead being 3-4 activities per section that engage students in connecting ideas, solving problems, and developing understanding of key calculus concepts; each section begins with motivating questions, a brief introduction, and a preview activity, all of which are designed to be read and completed prior to class; following the WeBWorK exercises in each section, there are several challenging problems that require students to connect key ideas and write to communicate their understanding.

(8 reviews)