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Read more about Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future

Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future

Asao Inoue, University of Washington Tacoma


In Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies, Asao B. Inoue theorizes classroom writing assessment as a complex system that is "more than" its interconnected elements. To explain how and why antiracist work in the writing classroom is vital to literacy learning, Inoue incorporates ideas about the white racial habitus that informs dominant discourses in the academy and other contexts. Inoue helps teachers understand the unintended racism that often occurs when teachers do not have explicit antiracist agendas in their assessments. Drawing on his own teaching and classroom inquiry, Inoue offers a heuristic for developing and critiquing writing assessment ecologies that explores seven elements of any writing assessment ecology: power, parts, purposes, people, processes, products, and places.

(6 reviews)

Read more about Beyond Dichotomy: Synergizing Writing Center and Classroom Pedagogies

Beyond Dichotomy: Synergizing Writing Center and Classroom Pedagogies

Steven Corbett, George Mason University


How closely can or should writing centers and writing classrooms collaborate? Beyond Dichotomy explores how research on peer tutoring one-to-one and in small groups can inform our work with students in writing centers and other tutoring programs, as well as in writing courses and classrooms. These multi-method (including rhetorical and discourse analyses and ethnographic and case-study) investigations center on several course-based tutoring (CBT) partnerships at two universities. Rather than practice separately in the center or in the classroom, rather than seeing teacher here and tutor there and student over there, CBT asks all participants in the dynamic drama of teaching and learning to consider the many possible means of connecting synergistically.

(3 reviews)

Read more about Building Maintenance & Construction: Tools and Maintenance Tasks

Building Maintenance & Construction: Tools and Maintenance Tasks

Clifford Rutherford

Building Maintenance & Construction: Tools and Maintenance Tasks introduces and develops knowledge of basic building maintenance tools and materials, applied skills and techniques, industry health and safety standards, and preventive maintenance and troubleshooting practices required by employers for entry-level positions in the building trades and facilities maintenance fields.

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about Chinese Rhetoric and Writing: An Introduction for Language Teachers

Chinese Rhetoric and Writing: An Introduction for Language Teachers

Andy Kirkpatrick, Griffith University

Zhichang Xu, Monash University


The authors of Chinese Rhetoric and Writing offer a response to the argument that Chinese students' academic writing in English is influenced by "culturally nuanced rhetorical baggage that is uniquely Chinese and hard to eradicate." Noting that this argument draws from "an essentially monolingual and Anglo-centric view of writing," they point out that the rapid growth in the use of English worldwide calls for "a radical reassessment of what English is in today's world." The result is a book that provides teachers of writing, and in particular those involved in the teaching of English academic writing to Chinese students, an introduction to key stages in the development of Chinese rhetoric, a wide-ranging field with a history of several thousand years. Understanding this important rhetorical tradition provides a strong foundation for assessing and responding to the writing of this growing group of students.

(4 reviews)

Read more about Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research

Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research

Cheryl Lowry, Ohio State University


Choosing & Using Sources presents a process for academic research and writing, from formulating your research question to selecting good information and using it effectively in your research assignments. Additional chapters cover understanding types of sources, searching for information, and avoiding plagiarism. Each chapter includes self-quizzes and activities to reinforce core concepts and help you apply them. There are also appendices for quick reference on search tools, copyright basics, and fair use.

(32 reviews)

Read more about Comprehensive Individualized Curriculum and Instructional Design: Curriculum and Instruction for Students
with Developmental Disabilities/Autism Spectrum Disorders

Comprehensive Individualized Curriculum and Instructional Design: Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Developmental Disabilities/Autism Spectrum Disorders

Samuel Sennott, Portland State University

Sheldon Loman, Portland State University


This open textbook addresses the population of individuals with disabilities that experience complex lifelong needs across multiple areas in their lives. Drs. Sennott and Loman drafted this book (along with the help from some friends) with the hope of providing pertinent, practical, and current resources to future special educators who plan to serve individuals with complex disabilities.

(7 reviews)

Read more about Concepts of Fitness and Wellness

Concepts of Fitness and Wellness

Scott Flynn

Lisa Jellum

Jonathan Howard

Althea Moser

David Mathis

Christin Collins

Sharryse Henderson

Connie Watjen


This open textbook for Concepts of Fitness and Wellness at Georgia Highlands College was created through a Round Seven ALG Textbook Transformation Grant.

(1 review)

Read more about Conventions 101: A Functional Approach to Teaching (And Assessing!) Grammar and Punctuation

Conventions 101: A Functional Approach to Teaching (And Assessing!) Grammar and Punctuation

Chauna Ramsey, Columbia Gorge Community College


This is a collection of cumulative units of study for conventional errors common in student writing. It's flexible, functional, and zeroes in problems typically seen in writing of all types, from the eternal “there/they're/their” struggle to correct colon use. Units are organized from most simple to most challenging.

(16 reviews)

Read more about Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom

Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom

Martine Rife, Lansing Community College

Shaun Slattery, DePaul University and the University of South Florida Polytechnic


The editors of Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Writing Classroom bring together stories, theories, and research that can further inform the ways in which we situate and address intellectual property issues in our writing classrooms. The essays in the collection identify and describe a wide range of pedagogical strategies, consider theories, present research, explore approaches, and offer both cautionary tales and local and contextual successes that can further inform the ways in which we situate and address intellectual property issues in our teaching.

(2 reviews)

Read more about Critical Expressivism: Theory and Practice in the Composition Classroom

Critical Expressivism: Theory and Practice in the Composition Classroom

Tara Roeder, St. John's University

Roseanne Gatto, St. John's University


Critical Expressivism is an ambitious attempt to re-appropriate intellectual territory that has more often been charted by its detractors than by its proponents. Indeed, as Peter Elbow observes in his contribution to this volume, "As far as I can tell, the term 'expressivist' was coined and used only by people who wanted a word for people they disapproved of and wanted to discredit." The editors and contributors to this collection invite readers to join them in a new conversation, one informed by "a belief that the term expressivism continues to have a vitally important function in our field."

(3 reviews)

Read more about Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing

Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing

David Franke, SUNY Cortland

Alex Reid, University at Buffalo

Anthony Di Renzo, Ithaca College


Design Discourse: Composing and Revising Programs in Professional and Technical Writing, edited byDavid Franke, Alex Reid, andAnthony Di Renzo,addresses the complexities of developing professional and technical writing programs. The essays in the collection offer reflections on efforts to bridge two cultures — what the editors characterize as the "art and science of writing" — often by addressing explicitly the tensions between them. Design Discourse offers insights into the high-stakes decisions made by program designers as they seek to "function at the intersection of the practical and the abstract, the human and the technical."

(1 review)

Read more about Education for a Digital World: Advice, Guidelines and Effective Practice from Around Globe

Education for a Digital World: Advice, Guidelines and Effective Practice from Around Globe

Sandy Hirtz

David Harper, Harvard Medical School


Education for a Digital World contains a comprehensive collection of proven strategies and tools for effective online teaching, based on the principles of learning as a social process. It offers practical, contemporary guidance to support e-learning decision-making, instructional choices, as well as program and course planning, and development.

(9 reviews)

Read more about Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Kelvin Seifert, University of Manitoba

Rosemary Sutton, Cleveland State University


Chapters in the text can be assigned either from beginning to end, as with a conventional printed book, or they can be selected in some other sequence to meet the needs of particular students or classes. In general the first half of the book focuses on broader questions and principles taken from psychology per se, and the second half focuses on somewhat more practical issues of teaching. But the division between “theory” and “practice” is only approximate; all parts of the book draw on research, theory, and practical wisdom wherever appropriate. Chapter 2 is about learning theory, and Chapter 3 is about development; but as we point out, these topics overlap with each other as well as with the concerns of daily teaching. Chapter 4 is about several forms of student diversity (what might be called individual differences in another context), and Chapter 5 is about one form of diversity that has become prominent in schools recently—students with disabilities. Chapter 6 is about motivation, a topic that is heavily studied by psychological researchers, but that also poses perennial challenges to classroom teachers.

(6 reviews)

Read more about ePortfolio Performance Support Systems: Constructing, Presenting, and Assessing Portfolios

ePortfolio Performance Support Systems: Constructing, Presenting, and Assessing Portfolios

Katherine Wills, Indiana University Purdue University at Columbus

Rich Rice, Texas Tech University


ePortfolio Performance Support Systems: Constructing, Presenting, and Assessing Portfolios addresses theories and practices advanced by some of the most innovative and active proponents of ePortfolios. Editors Katherine V. Wills and Rich Rice interweave twelve essays that address the ways in which ePortfolios can facilitate sustainable and measureable writing-related student development, assessment and accountability, learning and knowledge transfer, and principles related to universal design for learning, just-in-time support, interaction design, and usability testing.

(5 reviews)

Read more about Exploring Perspectives: A Concise Guide to Analysis

Exploring Perspectives: A Concise Guide to Analysis

Randall Fallows, University of California Los Angeles



The reason why Randall Fallows wrote Exploring Perspectives: A Concise Guide to Analysis is simple: to help give students a better understanding of how to discover, develop, and revise an analytical essay. Here is how his 5 chapter book goes about doing just that:


(12 reviews)

Read more about Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction

Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction

Beth Hewett, Conference on College Composition

Kevin DePew, Old Dominion University

Elif Guler, Longwood University

Robbin Zeff Warner


Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction, edited by Beth L. Hewett and Kevin Eric DePew, with associate editors Elif Guler and Robbin Zeff Warner, addresses the questions and decisions that administrators and instructors most need to consider when developing online writing programs and courses. Written by experts in the field (members of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Committee for Effective Practices in OWI and other experts and stakeholders), the contributors to this collection explain the foundations of the recently published (2013) A Position Statement of Principles and Examples Effective Practices for OWI and provide illustrative practical applications. To that end, in every chapter, the authors address issues of inclusive and accessible writing instruction (based upon physical and mental disability, linguistic ability, and socioeconomic challenges) in technology enhanced settings.

(4 reviews)

Read more about How to Learn Like a Pro!

How to Learn Like a Pro!

Phyllis Nissila, Lane Community College


How to Learn Like a Pro! features the “big six” effective learning/study skills topics: learning styles and preferences, time and materials management, critical thinking and reading, note-taking, memory principles, and test-taking techniques. Each of the six units featuring a total of twenty-three lessons and accompanying exercises (with a dash of humor here and there) were developed with the diverse student body of the community college in mind as well as learners in other educational venues.

(12 reviews)

Read more about Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Barbara D'Angelo, Arizona State University

Sandra Jamieson, Drew University

Barry Maid, Arizona State University


This collection brings together scholarship and pedagogy from multiple perspectives and disciplines, offering nuanced and complex perspectives on Information Literacy in the second decade of the 21st century. Taking as a starting point the concerns that prompted the Association of Research Libraries (ACRL) to review the Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education and develop the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (2015), the chapters in this collection consider six frameworks that place students in the role of both consumer and producer of information within today's collaborative information environments. Contributors respond directly or indirectly to the work of the ACRL, providing a bridge between past/current knowledge and the future and advancing the notion that faculty, librarians, administrators, and external stakeholders share responsibility and accountability for the teaching, learning, and research of Information Literacy.

(4 reviews)

Read more about Instruction in Functional Assessment

Instruction in Functional Assessment

Marcie Desrochers, State University of New York

Moira Fallon, State University of New York


Instruction in Functional Assessment introduces learners to functional assessment (FA), which includes a variety of assessment approaches (indirect, observational, and experimental) for identifying the cause of an individual's challenging behavior for the purpose of designing effective treatments. FA is mandated by federal law and is a recognized empirically based approach to treatment of individuals with challenging behaviors (e.g., disruptive, self-injurious, and aggressive behaviors). Instruction in FA is essential for students who will one day enter professions as educators, psychologists, social workers, counselors, or mental health professionals.

(4 reviews)

Read more about Mathematics for Elementary Teachers

Mathematics for Elementary Teachers

Michelle Manes, Honolulu, HI

This book will help you to understand elementary mathematics more deeply, gain facility with creating and using mathematical notation, develop a habit of looking for reasons and creating mathematical explanations, and become more comfortable exploring unfamiliar mathematical situations.

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about Open Research

Open Research

Multiple Authors, Institute of Educational Technology at the Open University


If you have an interest in openness, open education, research skills or want to find out more about the impact of Open EducationalResources (OER), then this resource is for you. You could be:

(1 review)

Read more about Project Management for Instructional Designers

Project Management for Instructional Designers

Multiple Authors, Brigham Young University


Project Management for Instructional Designers (PM4ID) is – as the name suggests – a book about project management tailored specifically for instructional designers. This book is a revise / remix of a pre-existing, openly licensed project management textbook which was donated to the commons by a benefactor that desires to be attributed as Anonymous.

(8 reviews)

Read more about Reading With My Eyes Open: Embracing the critical and the personal in language pedagogy

Reading With My Eyes Open: Embracing the critical and the personal in language pedagogy

Gerdi Quist, University College London


Untangling the various approaches to language teaching and their history, Gerdi Quist maps recent thinking in language studies at university. Using an interdisciplinary theoretical framework, drawn from educational philosophy, cultural studies, intercultural studies and language pedagogy, the author discusses the many tensions and currents in contemporary language teaching. The author puts forward an alternative pedagogy, that of a cultuurtekst-perspective, which engages learners at complex linguistic and cultural levels. In discussing the case study in which this approach is tested, the author develops her argument for embracing various critical perspectives through the personal engagement of students. From the start the author acknowledges her own engaged position as a language teacher in a liberal humanistic educational environment. She adopts a self-critical perspective through which her engagement with adverse student reaction leads to deepening insights both for the author and her students as part of the non-linear process of learning. Gerdi Quist teaches Dutch language and lectures on multiculturalism and intercultural communication. Recent publications included a book chapter and journal articles on language pedagogy and intercultural communication.

(2 reviews)

Read more about Steps to Success: Crossing the Bridge Between Literacy Research and Practice

Steps to Success: Crossing the Bridge Between Literacy Research and Practice

Kristen Munger, SUNY Oswego


Steps to Success: Crossing the Bridge Between Literacy Research and Practice introduces instructional strategies linked to the most current research-supported practices in the field of literacy. The book includes chapters related to scientifically-based literacy research, early literacy development, literacy assessment, digital age influences on children's literature, literacy development in underserved student groups, secondary literacy instructional strategies, literacy and modern language, and critical discourse analysis. Chapters are written by authors with expertise in both college teaching and the delivery of research-supported literacy practices in schools. The book features detailed explanations of a wide variety of literacy strategies that can be implemented by both beginning and expert practitioners. Readers will gain knowledge about topics frequently covered in college literacy courses, along with guided practice for applying this knowledge in their future or current classrooms. The book's success-oriented framework helps guide educators toward improving their own practices and is designed to foster the literacy development of students of all ages.

(13 reviews)

Read more about Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom

Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom

Melissa Tombro, The Fashion Institute of Technology


Teaching Autoethnography: Personal Writing in the Classroom is dedicated to the practice of immersive ethnographic and autoethnographic writing that encourages authors to participate in the communities about which they write. This book draws not only on critical qualitative inquiry methods such as interview and observation, but also on theories and sensibilities from creative writing and performance studies, which encourage self-reflection and narrative composition. Concepts from qualitative inquiry studies, which examine everyday life, are combined with approaches to the creation of character and scene to help writers develop engaging narratives that examine chosen subcultures and the author's position in relation to her research subjects. The book brings together a brief history of first-person qualitative research and writing from the past forty years, examining the evolution of nonfiction and qualitative approaches in relation to the personal essay. A selection of recent student writing in the genre as well as reflective student essays on the experience of conducting research in the classroom is presented in the context of exercises for coursework and beyond. Also explored in detail are guidelines for interviewing and identifying subjects and techniques for creating informed sketches and images that engage the reader. This book provides approaches anyone can use to explore their communities and write about them first-hand. The methods presented can be used for a single assignment in a larger course or to guide an entire semester through many levels and varieties of informed personal writing.

(6 reviews)

Read more about Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media

Teaching Crowds: Learning and Social Media

Jon Dron, Athabasca University

Terry Anderson, Athabasca University


Within the rapidly expanding field of educational technology, learners and educators must confront a seemingly overwhelming selection of tools designed to deliver and facilitate both online and blended learning. Many of these tools assume that learning is configured and delivered in closed contexts, through learning management systems (LMS). However, while traditional "classroom" learning is by no means obsolete, networked learning is in the ascendant. A foundational method in online and blended education, as well as the most common means of informal and self-directed learning, networked learning is rapidly becoming the dominant mode of teaching as well as learning.

(3 reviews)

Read more about Teaching in a Digital Age: Guidelines for designing teaching and learning for a digital age

Teaching in a Digital Age: Guidelines for designing teaching and learning for a digital age

A.W. (Tony) Bates, University of British Columbia


Teachers, instructors and faculty are facing unprecedented change, with often larger classes, more diverse students, demands from government and employers who want more accountability and the development of graduates who are workforce ready, and above all, we are all having to cope with ever changing technology. To handle change of this nature, teachers and instructors need a base of theory and knowledge that will provide a solid foundation for their teaching, no matter what changes or pressures they face.

(18 reviews)

Read more about The Centrality of Style

The Centrality of Style

Mike Duncan, University of Houston-Downtown

Star M. Vanguri, Nova Southeastern University


InThe Centrality of Style, editors Mike Duncan and Star Medzerian Vanguri argue that style is a central concern of composition studies even as they demonstrate that some of the most compelling work in the area has emerged from the margins of the field. Calling attention to this paradox in his foreword to the collection, Paul Butler observes, "Many of the chapters work within the liminal space in which style serves as both a centralizing and decentralizing force in rhetoric and composition. Clearly, the authors and editors have made an invaluable contribution in their collection by exposing the paradoxical nature of a canon that continues to play a vital role in our disciplinary history."

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about The Changing Story: digital stories that participate in transforming teaching & learning

The Changing Story: digital stories that participate in transforming teaching & learning

Linda Buturian, University of Minnesota


The Changing Story gives you assignments, resources, and examples to use in your teaching and learning. It will also help you think of ways digital stories can be used in your teaching, and help students harness the power of visual storytelling.

(14 reviews)

Read more about The Information Literacy User's Guide: An Open, Online Textbook

The Information Literacy User's Guide: An Open, Online Textbook

Deborah Bernnard, University of Albany

Greg Bobish, University of Albany

Daryl Bullis, Babson College

Jenna Hecker, University of Albany

Irina Holden, University of Albany

Allison Hosier, University of Albany

Trudi Jacobson, University of Albany

Tor Loney, Albany Public Library


Good researchers have a host of tools at their disposal that make navigating today's complex information ecosystem much more manageable. Gaining the knowledge, abilities, and self-reflection necessary to be a good researcher helps not only in academic settings, but is invaluable in any career, and throughout one's life. The Information Literacy User's Guide will start you on this route to success.

(11 reviews)

Read more about WAC and Second-Language Writers: Research Towards Linguistically and Culturally Inclusive Programs and Practices

WAC and Second-Language Writers: Research Towards Linguistically and Culturally Inclusive Programs and Practices

Terry Zawacki, George Mason University

Michelle Cox, Dartmouth College


In WAC and Second-Language Writers, the editors and contributors pursue the ambitious goal of including within WAC theory, research, and practice the differing perspectives, educational experiences, and voices of second-language writers. The chapters within this collection not only report new research but also share a wealth of pedagogical, curricular, and programmatic practices relevant to second-language writers. Representing a range of institutional perspectives—including those of students and faculty at public universities, community colleges, liberal arts colleges, and English-language schools—and a diverse set of geographical and cultural contexts, the editors and contributors report on work taking place in the United States, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

(4 reviews)

Read more about WAC Partnerships Between Secondary and Postsecondary Institutions

WAC Partnerships Between Secondary and Postsecondary Institutions

Jacob Blumner, University of Michigan-Flint

Pamela Childers, McCallie School


Working with educators at all academic levels involved in WAC partnerships, the authors and editors of this collection demonstrate successful models of collaboration between schools and institutions so others can emulate and promote this type of collaboration. The chapters in this collection describe and reflect on collaborative partnerships among middle schools, high schools, colleges, and universities that are designed to prepare students for the kinds of work and civic engagement required to succeed in and contribute to society. The WAC partnerships celebrated in this collection include frameworks to build connectivity between institutions while addressing Common Core State Standards, academic and non-academic collaborations around science education, WAC partnerships in Argentina and Germany, and both long- and short-term collaborations.

No ratings

(0 reviews)

Read more about Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

Working With Academic Literacies: Case Studies Towards Transformative Practice

Theresa Lillis, The Open University

Kathy Harrington, London Metropolitan University

Mary Lea, Open University

Sally Mitchell, Queen Mary University of London


The editors and contributors to this collection explore what it means to adopt an "academic literacies" approach in policy and pedagogy. Transformative practice is illustrated through case studies and critical commentaries from teacher-researchers working in a range of higher education contexts—from undergraduate to postgraduate levels, across disciplines, and spanning geopolitical regions including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Cataluña, Finland, France, Ireland, Portugal, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Key questions addressed include: How can a wider range of semiotic resources and technologies fruitfully serve academic meaning and knowledge making? What kinds of writing spaces do we need and how can these be facilitated? How can theory and practice from "Academic Literacies" be used to open up debate about writing pedagogy at institutional and policy levels?

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(0 reviews)

Read more about Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

Writing Programs Worldwide: Profiles of Academic Writing in Many Places

Chris Thaiss, University of California, Davis

Gerd Bräuer, University of Education

Paula Carlino, University of Buenos Aires

Lisa Ganobcsik-Williams, Coventry University

Aparna Sinha, University of California, Davis


Emerging from the International WAC/WID Mapping Project, this collection of essays is meant to inform decision-making by teachers, program managers, and college/university administrators considering how writing can most appropriately be defined, managed, funded, and taught in the places where they work. Writing Programs Worldwide offers an important global perspective to the growing research literature in the shaping of writing programs. The authors of its program profiles show how innovators at a diverse range of universities on six continents have dealt creatively over many years with day-to-day and long-range issues affecting how students across disciplines and languages grow as communicators and learners.

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(0 reviews)