Operational Amplifiers & Linear Integrated Circuits: Theory and Application / 3E

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James Fiore, Mohawk Valley Community College

Pub Date: 2018

ISBN 13:

Publisher: dissidents

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introductory Concepts and Fundamentals

  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 The Decibel
  • 1.3 Bode Plots
  • 1.4 Combining The Elements - Multi-Stage Effects
  • 1.5 Circuit Simulations Using Computers
  • 1.6 The Differential Amplifier
  • Summary

Chapter 2: Operational Amplifier Internals

  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 What Is An Op Amp?
  • 2.3 Simple Op Amp Comparator
  • 2.4 Op Amp Manufacture
  • Summary

Chapter 3: Negative Feedback

  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 What Negative Feedback Is and Why We Use It
  • 3.3 Basic Concepts
  • 3.4 The Four Variants of Negative Feedback
  • 3.5 Limitations On The Use of Negative Feedback
  • Summary

Chapter 4: Basic Op Amp Circuits

  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Inverting and Non-inverting Amplifiers
  • 4.3 Single Supply Biasing
  • 4.4 Current Boosting
  • Summary

Chapter 5: Practical Limitations of Op Amp Circuits

  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Frequency Response
  • 5.3 Gain-Bandwidth Product
  • 5.4 Slew Rate and Power Bandwidth
  • 5.5 Offsets
  • 5.6 Drift
  • 5.7 CMRR and PSRR
  • 5.8 Noise
  • Summary

Chapter 6: Specialized Op Amps

  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Instrumentation Amplifiers
  • 6.3 Programmable Op Amps
  • 6.4 Op Amps for High Current, Power, and Voltage Applications
  • 6.5 High Speed Amplifiers
  • 6.6 Voltage Followers and Buffers
  • 6.7 Operational Transconductance Amplifier
  • 6.8 Norton Amplifier
  • 6.9 Current Feedback Amplifiers
  • 6.10 Other Specialized Devices
  • Summary

Chapter 7: Non-Linear Circuits

  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Precision Rectifiers
  • 7.3 Wave Shaping
  • 7.4 Function Generation
  • 7.5 Comparators
  • 7.6 Log and Anti-Log Amplifiers
  • 7.7 Extended Topic: A Precision Log Amp
  • Summary

Chapter 8: Voltage Regulation

  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 The Need For Regulation
  • 8.3 Linear Regulators
  • 8.4 Switching Regulators
  • 8.5 Heat Sink Usage
  • 8.6 Extended Topic: Primary Switcher
  • Summary

Chapter 9: Oscillators and Frequency Generators

  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Op Amp Oscillators
  • 9.3 Single Chip Oscillators and Frequency Generators
  • Summary

Chapter 10: Integrators and Differentiators

  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Integrators
  • 10.3 Differentiators
  • 10.4 Analog Computer
  • 10.5 Alternatives to Integrators and Differentiators
  • 10.6 Extended Topic: Other Integrator and Differentiator Circuits
  • Summary

Chapter 11: Active Filters

  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Filter Types
  • 11.3 The Use and Advantages of Active Filters
  • 11.4 Filter Order and Poles
  • 11.5 Filter Class or Alignment
  • 11.6 Realizing Practical Filters
  • 11.7 Band-Pass Filter Realizations
  • 11.8 Notch Filter (Band-Reject) Realizations
  • 11.9 Audio Equalizers
  • 11.10 Switched-Capacitor Filters
  • 11.11 Extended Topic: Voltage-Controlled Filters
  • Summary

Chapter 12: Analog-to-Digital-to-Analog Conversion

  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 The Sampling Theorem
  • 12.3 Resolution and Sampling Rate
  • 12.4 Digital-to-Analog Conversion Techniques
  • 12.5 Analog-to-Digital Conversion
  • 12.6 Extended Topic: Digital Signal Processing
  • Summary

 

About the Book

The goal of this text, as its name implies, is to allow the reader to become proficient in the analysis and design of circuits utilizing modern linear ICs. It progresses from the fundamental circuit building blocks through to analog/digital conversion systems. The text is intended for use in a second year Operational Amplifiers course at the Associate level, or for a junior level course at the Baccalaureate level. In order to make effective use of this text, students should have already taken a course in basic discrete transistor circuits, and have a solid background in algebra and trigonometry, along with exposure to phasors. Calculus is used in certain sections of the text, but for the most part, its use is kept to a minimum. For students without a calculus background, these sections may be skipped without a loss of continuity. (The sole exception to this being Chapter Ten, Integrators and Differentiators, which hinges upon knowledge of calculus.)

About the Contributors

Author(s)

James M. Fiore

My name is Jim and I'm the resident dissident, programmer and author. I've been a college professor for many years teaching in the areas of electrical engineering technology, computer programming and the science of sound. I'm also a musician and an endurance athlete. I established dissidents in the late 1980s as a way to offer various software items that I created, figuring that other people might find them useful as well. Some of these have been commercial and some have been freeware. I also write a lot, including published college text books and lab manuals. Recently, the open educational resource movement has gained momentum (no doubt at least partly propelled by the rising costs of college tuition and texts).