The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry

(7 reviews)

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David Ball, Cleveland State University
John Hill, University of Wisconsin
Rhonda Scott, Southern Adventist University

Pub Date: 2011

ISBN 13: 978-1-4533110-9-7

Publisher: Saylor Foundation

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Reviewed by Jeffrey Vargason, Associate Professor, George Fox University, on 8/16/2017.

GOB (General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry) is traditionally taught as either a one-semester or a two-semester format. Based on the preface, … read more

 

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Reviewed by Sean Breslin, Professor of Chemistry, Umpqua Community College, on 6/21/2017.

The text lives up to its stated purpose. It covers basic parts of general, organic, and biological chemistry but without much depth. It avoids … read more

 

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Reviewed by David Canoy, Instructor, Chemeketa Community College, on 4/12/2017.

Assuming this book is for an entry level class of students preparing to take a human anatomy and physiology course, it is very thorough in the area … read more

 

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Reviewed by Kenneth Friedrich, Instructor of Chemistry, Portland Community College, on 12/6/2016.

As the title suggests this book covers the basics of GOB chemistry. It includes all the appropriate material for a one semester GOB course. The … read more

 

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Reviewed by Beth Manhat, Adjunct Professor, Portland Community College, on 8/22/2016.

This open course textbook introduces the fundamental of general chemistry (measurements, atomic structure, compounds, energy, reactions, etc), … read more

 

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Reviewed by Paul Laybourn, Professor, Colorado State University, on 1/8/2016.

Overall, this textbook covers all the appropriate topics to the depth necessary for a one semester course on general, organic and biological … read more

 

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Reviewed by Brian Kalet, Academic Success Coordinator, Colorado State University, on 1/8/2016.

This text is intended for a one semester general, organic, biochemistry course and as such would not be appropriate for a standalone general … read more

 

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Chemistry, Matter, and Measurement
  • Chapter 2: Elements, Atoms, and the Periodic Table
  • Chapter 3: Ionic Bonding and Simple Ionic Compounds
  • Chapter 4: Covalent Bonding and Simple Molecular Compounds
  • Chapter 5: Introduction to Chemical Reactions
  • Chapter 6: Quantities in Chemical Reactions
  • Chapter 7: Energy and Chemical Processes
  • Chapter 8: Solids, Liquids, and Gases
  • Chapter 9: Solutions
  • Chapter 10: Acids and Bases
  • Chapter 11: Nuclear Chemistry
  • Chapter 12: Organic Chemistry: Alkanes and Halogenated Hydrocarbons
  • Chapter 13: Unsaturated and Aromatic Hydrocarbons
  • Chapter 14: Organic Compounds of Oxygen
  • Chapter 15: Organic Acids and Bases and Some of Their Derivatives
  • Chapter 16: Carbohydrates
  • Chapter 17: Lipids
  • Chapter 18: Amino Acids, Proteins, and Enzymes
  • Chapter 19: Nucleic Acids
  • Chapter 20: Energy Metabolism

About the Book

The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry by David W. Ball, John W. Hill, and Rhonda J. Scott is for the one-semester General, Organic and Biological Chemistry course. The authors designed this textbook from the ground up to meet the needs of a one-semester course. It is 20 chapters in length and approximately 350-400 pages; just the right breadth and depth for instructors to teach and students to grasp.

In addition, The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry is written not by one chemist, but THREE chemistry professors with specific, complimentary research and teaching areas. David W. Ball’s specialty is physical chemistry, John W. Hill’s is organic chemistry, and finally, Rhonda J. Scott’s background is in enzyme and peptide chemistry. These three authors have the expertise to identify and present only the most important material for students to learn in the GOB Chemistry course.

These experienced authors have ensured their text has ample in-text examples, and ”Test Yourself“ questions following the examples so students can immediately check their comprehension. The end-of-chapter exercises will be paired, with one answered in the back of the text so homework can easily be assigned and self-checked.

The Basics of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry by David W. Ball, John W. Hill, and Rhonda J. Scott is the right text for you and your students if you are looking for a GOB textbook with just the right amount of coverage without overdoing the concepts and overwhelming your students.
 

About the Contributors

Author(s)

Dr. David W. Ball is a professor of chemistry at Cleveland State University in Ohio. He earned his PhD from Rice University in Houston, Texas. His specialty is physical chemistry, which he teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels. About 50% of his teaching is in general chemistry: chemistry for nonscience majors, GOB, and general chemistry for science and engineering majors. In addition to this text, he is the author of a math review book for general chemistry students, a physical chemistry textbook with accompanying student and instructor solutions manuals, and two books on spectroscopy (published by SPIE Press). He is coauthor of a general chemistry textbook (with Dan Reger and Scott Goode), whose third edition was published in January 2009. His publication list has over 180 items, roughly evenly distributed between research papers and articles of educational interest.

Dr. John W. Hill is professor emeritus from the University of Wisconsin–River Falls. He earned his PhD from the University of Arkansas. As an organic chemist, he has more than 50 publications in refereed journals, most of which have an educational bent. He has authored or coauthored several introductory level chemistry textbooks, all of which have gone into multiple editions. He has also presented over 60 papers at national conferences, many relating to science education. He has received several awards for outstanding teaching and has long been active in the American Chemical Society—both locally and nationally.

Dr. Rhonda J. Scott is a professor of chemistry at Southern Adventist University in Collegedale, Tennessee. She earned her PhD from the University of California at Riverside and has a background in enzyme and peptide chemistry. Previous to Southern Adventist, she taught at Loma Linda University and the University of Wisconsin–River Falls. In the past 10 years, she has made several presentations at national American Chemical Society meetings and other workshops and conferences. She has also been very active in the development of teaching materials, having reviewed or contributed to other textbooks and test banks.