Semiconductor Devices: Theory and Application

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James Fiore, Mohawk Valley Community College

Pub Date: 2018

ISBN 13:

Publisher: dissidents

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Semiconductor Fundamentals

  • 1.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Atomic Structure
  • 1.3 Crystals
  • 1.4 Doped Materials
  • Summary

Chapter 2: PN Junctions and Diodes

  • 2.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 The PN Junction
  • 2.3 Diode Data Sheet Interpretation
  • 2.4 Diode Circuit Models
  • 2.5 Other Types of Diodes
  • Summary

Chapter 3: Diode Applications

  • 3.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Rectification
  • 3.3 Clippers
  • 3.4 Clampers
  • Summary

Chapter 4: Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs)

  • 4.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The Bipolar Junction Transistor
  • 4.3 BJT Collector Curves
  • 4.4 BJT Data Sheet Interpretation
  • 4.5 Ebers-Moll Model
  • 4.6 DC Load Lines
  • 4.7 BJT Switching and Driver Applications
  • Summary

Chapter 5: BJT Biasing

  • 5.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 The Need For Biasing
  • 5.3 Two-Supply Emitter Bias
  • 5.4 Voltage Divider Bias
  • 5.5 Feedback Biasing
  • Summary

Chapter 6: Amplifier Concepts

  • 6.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Amplifier Model
  • 6.3 Compliance and Distortion
  • 6.4 Frequency Response and Noise
  • 6.5 Miller's Theorem
  • Summary

Chapter 7: BJT Small Signal Amplifiers

  • 7.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Simplified AC Model of the BJT
  • 7.3 Common Emitter Amplifier
  • 7.4 Common Collector Amplifier
  • 7.5 Common Base Amplifier
  • 7.6 Multi-Stage Amplifiers
  • Summary

Chapter 8: BJT Class A Power Amplifiers

  • 8.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Amplifier Classes
  • 8.3 Class A Operation and Load Lines
  • 8.4 Loudspeakers
  • 8.5 Power Transistor Data Sheet Interpretation
  • 8.6 Heat Sinks
  • Summary

Chapter 9: BJT Class B Power Amplifiers

  • 9.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 The Class B Configuration
  • 9.3 Extensions and Refinements
  • Summary

Chapter 10: Junction Field Effect Transistors (JFETs)

  • 10.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 JFET Internals
  • 10.3 JFET Data Sheet Interpretation
  • 10.4 JFET Biasing
  • Summary

Chapter 11: JFET Small Signal Amplifiers

  • 11.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Simplified AC Model of the JFET
  • 11.3 Common Source Amplifier
  • 11.4 Common Drain Amplifier
  • 11.5 Multi-stage and Combination Circuits
  • 11.6 Ohmic Region Operation
  • Summary

Chapter 12: Metal Oxide Semiconductor FETs (MOSFETs)

  • 12.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 The DE-MOSFET
  • 12.3 DE-MOSFET Biasing
  • 12.4 The E-MOSFET
  • 12.5 E-MOSFET Data Sheet Interpretation
  • 12.6 E-MOSFET Biasing
  • Summary

Chapter 13: MOSFET Small Signal Amplifiers

  • 13.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 MOSFET Common Source Amplifiers
  • 13.3 MOSFET Common Drain Followers
  • Summary

Chapter 14: Class D Power Amplifiers

  • 14.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Class D Basics
  • 14.3 Pulse Width Modulation
  • 14.4 Output Configurations
  • Summary

Chapter 15: Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs)

  • 15.0 Chapter Objectives
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 IGBT Internals
  • 15.3 IGBT Data Sheet Interpretation
  • 15.4 IGBT Applications
  • Summary

About the Book

The goal of this text, as its name implies, is to allow the reader to become proficient in the analysis and design of circuits utilizing discrete semiconductor devices. It progresses from basic diodes through bipolar and field effect transistors. The text is intended for use in a first or second year course on semiconductors at the Associate or Baccalaureate level. In order to make effective use of this text, students should have already taken coursework in basic DC and AC circuits, and have a solid background in algebra and trigonometry along with exposure to phasors. Calculus is used in certain sections of the text but for the most part it is used for equation derivations and proofs, and is kept to a minimum. For students without a calculus background these sections may be skipped without a loss of continuity. 

There is also a lab manual for this textbook.

About the Contributors

Author(s)

James M. Fiore

My name is Jim and I'm the resident dissident, programmer and author. I've been a college professor for many years teaching in the areas of electrical engineering technology, computer programming and the science of sound. I'm also a musician and an endurance athlete. I established dissidents in the late 1980s as a way to offer various software items that I created, figuring that other people might find them useful as well. Some of these have been commercial and some have been freeware. I also write a lot, including published college text books and lab manuals. Recently, the open educational resource movement has gained momentum (no doubt at least partly propelled by the rising costs of college tuition and texts).