Financial Accounting

(5 reviews)

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Pub Date: 2016

ISBN 13:

Publisher: University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing

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Reviewed by Bill Joyce, Assistant Professor, Bemidji State University, on 6/11/2015.

The table of contents is very different than two standard textbooks I am currently using or used recently. It is difficult to understand d exactly … read more

 

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Reviewed by Allan Aspelund, Instructor, Century College, White Bear Lake, Minnesota, on 6/11/2015.

Good over-all coverage No glossary Index fair--could be more descriptive… read more

 

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Reviewed by Barbara Prince, Accounting Faculty, Anoka Ramsey Community College, on 6/11/2015.

No index or glossary. This seems to be a discussion for non-accounting majors that presents the material from for non-debit/credit emphasis. The … read more

 

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Reviewed by Candice (Candy) Heino, Instructor, Anoka Ramsey Community College, on 6/11/2015.

This text covers all of the usual topics in financial accounting, but with a broader business view surrounding the accounting procedures. IFRS is … read more

 

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Reviewed by David Sulzen, Associate Professor of Accountng, Ferrum College, on 2/9/2017.

All material covered in any entry level accounting textbook is covered, even an introduction to Auditing. The depth is very good for an accounting … read more

 

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Why Is Financial Accounting Important?
  • Chapter 2: What Should Decision Makers Know So That Good Decisions Can Be Made about an Organization?
  • Chapter 3: In What Form Is Financial Information Actually Delivered to Decision Makers Such as Investors and Creditors?
  • Chapter 4: How Does an Organization Accumulate and Organize the Information Necessary to Prepare Financial Statements?
  • Chapter 5: Why Must Financial Information Be Adjusted Prior to the Production of Financial Statements?
  • Chapter 6: Why Should Decision Makers Trust Financial Statements?
  • Chapter 7: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Receivables?
  • Chapter 8: How Does a Company Gather Information about Its Inventory?
  • Chapter 9: Why Does a Company Need a Cost Flow Assumption in Reporting Inventory?
  • Chapter 10: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Property and Equipment?
  • Chapter 11: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Intangible Assets?
  • Chapter 12: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Equity Investments?
  • Chapter 13: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Current and Contingent Liabilities?
  • Chapter 14: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Noncurrent Liabilities Such as Bonds?
  • Chapter 15: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Other Noncurrent Liabilities?
  • Chapter 16: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed about Shareholders’ Equity?
  • Chapter 17: In a Set of Financial Statements, What Information Is Conveyed by the Statement of Cash Flows?

About the Book

This book is intended for an undergraduate or MBA level Financial Accounting course. It covers the standard topics in a standard sequence, utilizing the Socratic method of asking and answering questions.

About the Contributors

Author(s)

Financial Accounting is adapted from a work produced by a publisher who has requested that they and the original author not receive attribution. This adapted edition is produced by the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing through the eLearning Support Initiative.