University Physics Volume 1

(3 reviews)

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Jeff Sanny, Loyola Marymount University
Samuel Ling, Truman State University

Pub Date: 2016

ISBN 13: 978-1-9381682-7-7

Publisher: OpenStax

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Reviewed by Dexian Ye, Associate Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University, on 4/12/2017.

This textbook (university physics volume 2) covers two units of introductory physics, thermodynamics and E&M, although usually we do not combine … read more

 

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Reviewed by Chadwick Young, Professor of Physics, Nicholls State University, on 2/9/2017.

This is the first in a 3-volume set. It covers all of classical mechanics along with waves and oscillations. It is appropriate for a calculus-based … read more

 

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Reviewed by Lawrence Davis, Associate Professor, Umpqua Community College, on 12/6/2016.

Generally yes. Covers the topics typically covered in the first term of a calculus based introductory (200-level) physics course. I did not see an … read more

 

Table of Contents

Preface
Unit 1. Mechanics

  • Chapter 1: Units and Measurement 
  • Chapter 2: Vectors
  • Chapter 3: Motion Along a Straight Line 
  • Chapter 4: Motion in Two and Three Dimensions 
  • Chapter 5: Newton's Laws of Motion 
  • Chapter 6: Applications of Newton's Laws 
  • Chapter 7: Work and Kinetic Energy 
  • Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy
  • Chapter 9: Linear Momentum and Collisions
  • Chapter 10: Fixed-Axis Rotation
  • Chapter 11: Angular Momentum 
  • Chapter 12: Static Equilibrium and Elasticity 
  • Chapter 13: Gravitation
  • Chapter 14: Fluid Mechanics 

Unit 2. Waves and Acoustics

  • Chapter 15: Oscillations
  • Chapter 16: Waves 
  • Chapter 17: Sound

Appendix A: Units
Appendix B: Conversion Factors 
Appendix C: Fundamental Constants 
Appendix D: Astronomical Data
Appendix E: Mathematical Formulas
Appendix F: Chemistry 
Appendix G: The Greek Alphabet 
Index

About the Book

University Physics is a three-volume collection that meets the scope and sequence requirements for two- and three-semester calculus-based physics courses. Volume 1 covers mechanics, sound, oscillations, and waves. This textbook emphasizes connections between between theory and application, making physics concepts interesting and accessible to students while maintaining the mathematical rigor inherent in the subject. Frequent, strong examples focus on how to approach a problem, how to work with the equations, and how to check and generalize the result.

About the Contributors

Author(s)

Dr. Jeff Sanny earned a BS in Physics from Harvey Mudd College in 1974 and a PhD in Solid State Physics from the University of California–Los Angeles in 1980. He joined the faculty at Loyola Marymount University in the fall of 1980. During his tenure, he has served as department Chair as well as Associate Dean. Dr. Sanny enjoys teaching introductory physics in particular. He is also passionate about providing students with research experience and has directed an active undergraduate student research group in space physics for many years.

Dr. Samuel Ling has taught introductory and advanced physics for over 25 years at Truman State University, where he is currently Professor of Physics and the Department Chair. Dr. Ling has two PhDs from Boston University, one in Chemistry and the other in Physics, and he was a Research Fellow at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, before joining Truman. Dr. Ling is also an author of A First Course in Vibrations and Waves, published by Oxford University Press. Dr. Ling has considerable experience with research in Physics Education and has published research on collaborative learning methods in physics teaching. He was awarded a Truman Fellow and a Jepson fellow in recognition of his innovative teaching methods. Dr. Ling’s research publications have spanned Cosmology, Solid State Physics, and Nonlinear Optics.